Siphon the python

Siphon the python
(of a male) urinate

Dictionary of Australian slang . 2013.

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  • siphon the python — Vrb phrs. Of males, to urinate. Also syphon the python …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • siphon the python —    (of a male)    to urinate    The common serpentine/penis imagery …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • siphon the python — Australian Slang (of a male) urinate …   English dialects glossary

  • syphon the python — Vrb phrs. Of males, to urinate. Light hearted expression, also spelt siphon the python …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • syphon the python — vb See siphon/syphon the python …   Contemporary slang

  • python —    the penis    The common serpentine imagery. Not viewed sexually and perhaps only used in the phrase siphon (or syphon) the python, to urinate …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • siphon — vb to urinate. A humorous vulgarism intro duced to a British audience via the Aus tralian character Barry McKenzie in Barry Humphries and Nicholas Garland s car toon strip in Private Eye magazine in the late 1960s. Drain the lizard/dragon/snake… …   Contemporary slang

  • drain the dragon — vb to urinate. Colourful euphemisms popu lar with (invariably male) college stu dents, hearty drinkers, etc. These expressions entered the slang lexicon of teenagers and college students in the late 1960s and early 1970s, although they are… …   Contemporary slang

  • drain the snake — vb to urinate. Colourful euphemisms popu lar with (invariably male) college stu dents, hearty drinkers, etc. These expressions entered the slang lexicon of teenagers and college students in the late 1960s and early 1970s, although they are… …   Contemporary slang

  • drain the lizard/dragon/snake — vb to urinate. Colourful euphemisms popu lar with (invariably male) college stu dents, hearty drinkers, etc. These expressions entered the slang lexicon of teenagers and college students in the late 1960s and early 1970s, although they are… …   Contemporary slang

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